Saturday, 1 May 2010

Becoming a Lawyer in Trinidad and Tobago

Q: I've been considering becoming a Lawyer in Trinidad, but it seems so hard and it looks like it will take me FOREVER!



A: Deciding to become an Attorney/Lawyer is a great choice! Although it may seem like a saturated field, everyday many people sign up to pursue the career. Don't think negatively!

Here's what you need to do after you browse the Legal Profession Act 1986

A. Majority of Entrants

1. Law degree from the University of the West Indies (LLB) plus, legal education certificate obtained after a two-year course at the law schools. Such persons are automatically accepted for entry as UWI LLB graduates.

or

2. Law degree from other recognised universities
(including an external University of London degree) plus the Legal Education Certificate (LEC). Affected persons are required to compete by examination for limited available places.

B. Others

1. Overseas qualification as a practitioner
(barrister, solicitor, attorney, etc.) plus legal education certificate (lec) obtained after a six-month course at the law schools. (no examinations for entry or to obtain lec- places have been available)

or

2. Admission of commonwealth attorneys of at least ten years call by order of the attorney general and minister of legal affairs. (Always for limited purpose of a specific court matter so far).A person applying to the High Court for admission to the bar is required to satisfy the court that he/she:

(a) is a Commonwealth citizen,
(b) is of good character, and either
(c) holds the qualifications prescribed by law, or
(d) is a person in respect of whom an Order has been
made under Section 15A.

By virtue of Section 15 (1A), a national of Trinidad & Tobago who-
(a) has passed the Bar Finals or the Bar Vocational Course at an institution validated by the General Council of the Bar of England and Wales, has been called to the Bar of England and Wales and has completed pupillage of at least six (6) months and is certified as such;

(b) has passed the Law Society Finals or the Legal Practice Course at an institution validated by the Law Society of England and Wales and having undertaken articles or a training contract in accordance with the Training Regulations of the Law Society of England and Wales, has been admitted to the roll of solicitors of the Supreme Court of England and Wales;

(c) has passed the Bar Vocational Course at an institution validated by the General Council of the Bar of England and Wales; or

(d) has passed the Legal Practice Course at an institution validated by the Law Society of England and Wales; and

(e) in the case of persons referred to in paragraphs (c) and (d) has obtained a certificate from the head of chambers of an attorney-at-law of not less than ten years standing, practising in Trinidad and Tobago to the effect that the national has undergone an attachment at those chambers for a continuous period of not less than six months doing work relating to the practice of Law, is deemed to hold the qualification prescribed by Law and is entitled, subject to the payment of the prescribed fees, to practise as an attorney-at-law in Trinidad and Tobago.

By virtue of Section 15A, which deals with special cases of admission, the Minister of Legal Affairs, where he considers it necessary or expedient after consultation with the Chief Justice, may by Order provide that a Commonwealth citizen who has been admitted to practise in a Commonwealth country for at least ten years, is eligible to be admitted to practise law in Trinidad and Tobago on such terms and conditions, including but not limited to the duration of the admission, as the Minister may specify in the Order.

236 comments:

1 – 200 of 236   Newer›   Newest»
Anonymous said...

how to become a teacher in trinidad withiut the extenuated long wait............we are short on teachers no

Anonymous said...

i am a young girl and i want to become a corporate lawyer what are the qualifications for doing so?

Trinbago Rights said...

LL.B, L.P.C. (England) or L.E.C. (Caribbean) and maybe an LL.M in Corporate Law if you really want to specialise. However, the LLB and LPC offer electives in Corporate Law, so you should make sure you take them and then with enough experience, the LLM may not be necessary.

I specialised in Employment Law and I did my LL.M. in London. The Masters really confirms your expertise.

Anonymous said...

Please advise on the prospects of becoming an attorney, i.e. qualifying for Bar exams having a LLB granted by a Cuban University.

Anxious Law Student.

Anonymous said...

Is the L.P.C recognized in Trinidad and Tobago?

Trinbago Rights said...

Yes, the UK's Legal Practice Course is recognised in Trindad and Tobago. After you complete it, you will have to return to Trinbago and work with an Attorney who has no less than 10 years experience for at least 6 months before you can apply (pay the fees) to be called to the bar.

Anonymous said...

I am living in Guyana i wrote cxc this year,i wanna be a lawyer,what are the qualifications for doing so?

Trinbago Rights said...

The same qualifications mentioned in this post apply to you. All of the Caribbean are guided by similar rules.

Anonymous said...

I am 30 years old and i am thinking of be coming a layer is there any age limit.

Trinbago Rights said...

I went to Law School in England with a guy who was in his 40s... and he was one of the brightest.

I guess it depends on the person and their ability to cope with the workload.

Anonymous said...

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Anonymous said...

Thank you for this site, I've found the information very useful as there is very little information avaiable generally.

I have just completed my LPC at the College of Law, but given the training contract situation in the UK I would like to qualify in Trinidad and within the other caribbean territories.

I therefore would like to complete the 6 month transitional program at Hugh Wooding Law School. I've found contradictory information on this particular process, some (including the Hugh Wooding website) say that a prerequisite of the 6 month transitional course is that you must have completed a training contract in the UK to be eligible for the course i.e. have been admitted to the role. However, a few 'friends of friends' who have also completed the LPC and moved back to Trinidad have said that they did not complete a training contract, but were still able to do the 6 month transitional course. Has Hugh Wooding recently changed their admissions criteria for the 6 month course? Any clarity you may be able to offer would be much appreciated. Thank you.

Trinbago Rights said...

Your steps:
1. Finish LPC and return to Trinbago
2. Work for 6 months with an Attorney who has been practicing for 10 years or longer.
3. Apply, pay the fee, and get called to the bar in Trinidad.

Anonymous said...

Does another language on your resume affect you career?

Kristoff said...

im a full-time student and i just completed my cape exams i've been accepted to do a literature's in english degree in uwi i personally love the subject and believe that a background in english literature will give me an edge and hopefully help me become a great lawyer what i was wondering was if pursuing this degree would be a good choice for me or should i start a law degree to save time? and do you believe that literature and law complement each other?

Anonymous said...

Hi,

I am seeking to apply for a traineeship at a firm in Trinidad but did not study at Hugh Wooding. A few firms I contacted have noted that they only accept Hugh Wooding law graduates. As such, I will be approaching other firms directly as it is my preference to train with a firm, as opposed to a sole practicioner. Would you be able to confirm:

1. If there is only one set time of year that
firms take in trainees? e.g the begining of the
financial year i.e. September as is the practice
in the UK for instance; and

2. If firms usually take on trainees more than once
for the year?

3. Is the above entirely firm specific?

Thank you

laurina101 said...

I'm aiming to be a lawyer but it will take me 3 years at UWI and another 2 years in a law school. I'm still pretty young but it seems that when i'm done i'll be around 26. So I hope you dont mind me asking but how did you get you career started so early?

laurina101 said...

Thank you for this. It was very helpful. I'm currently a form 5 student who wants to study law. I've done my research and from what I have found, I'll be able to practice law at 26. I see that you are that age and already have a steady career. If you don't mind me asking, how did you do it? And do you have any advice?

Laurina Ramkaran said...

can you tell me what other available jobs there are with an llb but not an legal education certificate? and do you think that trinidad has become over saturated with lawyers?

Anonymous said...

Hi Can you tell me what is the basic salary of a lawyer direct out of law school?

Anonymous said...

i want to become a lawyer as well but i dont no where to begin.....

Anonymous said...

I am currently pursuing my BA in criminal justice at COSTAATT and i want to become a crininal lawyer. Will doing this help me in anyway? Will it shorten my time @ UWI doing the llb law degree since there are law courses: caribbean legal systems, constitutional law and criminal law

Telfar said...

What are the fees you would have to pay before being called to the bar in Trinidad?

Anonymous said...

Is the LPC equivalent to LEC at Hugh wooding?

I would like to reduce the amount of time i would have to attend school before i get admitted to the Bar.
after the LPC what are the steps?
1. Finish LPC and return to Trinbago
2. Work for 6 months with an Attorney who has been practicing for 10 years or longer.
3. Apply, pay the fee, and get called to the bar in Trinidad.

is it more difficult to get called to the bar with a LPC as compared to a LEC?

Trinbago Rights said...

Yes, the L.P.C. is equivalent to the L.E.C.

After the L.P.C., you can:
(a) stay in the UK and do a 1-yeartraining contract
(b) return home and train with an Attorney for 6 months (shorter route- most Trinis do this)

Au contraire mon ami, neither is more difficult than the other. Getting called to the bar with British training (L.P.C.) is a much better benefit for you because British education is seen is better. The L.P.C., in my opinion, is superior to the L.E.C. The only advantage is that the L.E.C. is region specific, whereas, the L.P.C. will obviously be more British law (which we use anyway).

Trinbago Rights said...

A second language is an ASSET!

Trinbago Rights said...

Paralegal is the only job coming to mind.

The legal profession is over-saturated in every country.

Trinbago Rights said...

There are many semi-literate Lawyers who can barely write proper report and that does not affect the legal ability. I think a degree like that is not very helpful for law.

stephens molekwa said...

Hi
I am student in South Africa studying the LLB degree.I wish to be admitted as an attorney in Trinidad one day.Which course should I follow after I graduate?

Anonymous said...

Do you know how much a Family (divorce) lawyer with little experience is paid in Trinidad?

Trinbago Rights said...

Salaries are obviously dependent on the firm and their ability to pay a specific salary.

Trinbago Rights said...

I've already explained in the post.

Anonymous said...

Hello, I am currently at Hugh Wooding Law School but I want to be qualified in England. How do I do this

Anonymous said...

What qualifications are required to become a Tax Lawyer in Trinidad? I have not been able to source a school that offers such specialization.

Trinbago Rights said...

You need to qualify and choose tax law as your elective. Possibly do an LL.M. in Tax Law.

Trinbago Rights said...

Go to England and do the Legal Practice Course.

Anonymous said...

I recently got acceptance at UWI(sta) for law. Do they offer tax law as an elective? I sourced a law faculty handbook for Cavehill(uwi) and it didn't have that option. So now I'm wondering if it's offered at UWI(sta). Another thing, do you know what institutions in Trinidad offers the LL.M. in taxation law. I'm only familiar with universities overseas that offer it.

Trinbago Rights said...

I don't know what happens at UWI; I did all my studies in the USA and UK.

According to its website, UWI only offers LL.M.s in Legislative Drafting, Corporate and Public Law. I doubt any other institution in the Caribbean is able to offer an LL.M. with proper accreditation. For Tax, you will most likely have to go away to study.

To specialise, you may

Anonymous said...

Hi
I'm only 15yrs old but i'm already set on wanting to do Constitutional Law, my mind is made up and I'm strong headed about it.
Any advice ?

Trinbago Rights said...

If that's your passion, go for it. I would also recommend doing law at the 6th form level if you decide to study in T&T. Only St. Augustine Secondary and UWI 6th form school offer it. You'll have a head start by the time you start your LL.B.

Anonymous said...

Hello,
If I completed my bachelor degree in International Relations with a minor in Economics and I want to pursue my masters in Corporate Law, what steps do I take in becoming a lawyer and obtaining the LEC

Anonymous said...

Hey, same 15yr old again.. Where should I go to continue my Law degree?

Trinbago Rights said...

In order to do the L.E.C., you need a qualifying law degree. As far as I know, there are only two qualifying law degrees:

1. An LLB - there are 2-year graduate routes offered through the University of London, but you need to consider what people may think of a Lawyer who studied via an online course.

2. A Graduate Diploma in Law (G.D.L.), also known as the Common Professional Examination (C.P.E.) only offered in the UK (which is what I did). This is an intense 1-year course offered by around 14 universities in the UK. I attended the University of Hertfordshire.

Trinbago Rights said...

You have to decided what you/your sponsors can afford. If money is no object, go to England.

Anonymous said...

Hi I'm interested in being a Corporate secretary. Currently I'm studying at Kaplan University for a Bsc in paralegal studies. what would be my next step after graduating from school. Will law schools in this country accept this degree into their schools?

Trinbago Rights said...

In order to become a Corporate Secretary, you must be called to the bar by doing the L.E.C. (Trinidad) or the L.P.C. (UK) and the subsequent training contract.

In order to do the L.E.C./L.P.C., you need a qualifying law degree. As far as I know, there are only two qualifying law degrees:

1. An LLB - there are 2-year graduate routes offered through the University of London, but you need to consider what people may think of a Lawyer who studied via an online course.

2. A Graduate Diploma in Law (G.D.L.), also known as the Common Professional Examination (C.P.E.) only offered in the UK (which is what I did). This is an intense 1-year course offered by around 14 universities in the UK. I attended the University of Hertfordshire.

traciss said...

Hi it's same Corporate Secretary person again . What would you recommend my steps for attaining this job goal. I only have 3 ordinary levels (including English A) and a high school diploma when I was living in the states. Also how to get funding from the government in achieving this goal, meaning who do I have to talk to. hope you understand my rambling.

Trinbago Rights said...

As far as I know, scholarships are offered based on A'level performance. Then there is GATE, which I don't know much about because I studied away.

I already outlined your steps above; a Corporate Secretary is an Attorney, so you have to qualify.

Anonymous said...

Hi is it possible to go from a paralegal to lawyer? If yes, what schools in the Caribbean or the UK will accept it. I studied in the US by the way.

Trinbago Rights said...

I still don't know what you studied and if you have a degree.

However, as I've continuously repeated, you need a qualifying degree to become a Lawyer (scroll up).

Anonymous said...

Hello. I have recently completed my LLB at the University of London.

I would like to practise in the Caribbean and I am a Barbadian citizen. Would you advise the LPC and training contract route? Or the BPTC (previously BVC) route? Then do the sixth month conversion in Trinidad. It looks as though the Training Contract route is much longer so what would be the benefits? Also if I took the Bar would I need a pupilage or tenancy and if so, how long? Thank you in advance.

Trinbago Rights said...

The BPTC is very long and an absolute waste of time.

Do the LPC in the UK, then do the 6 month training with a Lawyer in the region (must be practicing for over 7 years).

Anonymous said...

hi i would like to know what jobs i can attain with a LLB law degree in the business sector and what qualifications are necessary. i have completed one year at uwi an is about to complete two years at Barbados.

Randy Francis said...

You can become a lawyer in 3 years by completing an LLB at BPP London in 2 years intensive, and 1 year BPTC or LPC. You could also complete the LLB by staying home for the 2 yrs and doing it online or traveling to the UK, it really doesn't matter, just depends on your ability.

I am an agent for them and can assist with any further help you might need. Email me on lovrandy@hotmail.com.

Anonymous said...

HI I currently have a LLB(hons) from England however is considering doing a Legal executive course. instead of doing the LPC. As in England this can lead to becoming a Chartered Legal Execuitive Lawyer. is this recoginsed in Trinidad ?

Trinbago Rights said...

No.

Anonymous said...

your post refers to a trinidadian national with regard to the lpc ....does it apply to caricom nationals as well. or is there a different criteria for caricom nationals to qualify?

Trinbago Rights said...

Same system throughout the Caribbean.

Anonymous said...

Hi, a couple of questions...

1) Do you have to be a Caribbean national to practise in Trinidad or could you hold a UK passport?

2) If I have a UK LLB and have completed the BPTC and been called to the UK bar, but have not completed pupillage, would I still have to do an LPC/LEC to practise in Trinidad

Thank you

Abbas Hamid said...

I'm a Guyanese National with a UOL LL.B (Hons)im having a heck of a time trying to get into hugh wooding law school. Can i be accepted to the guyana bar if i undergo the LPC in the UK?

Trinbago Rights said...

Absolutely.

Trinbago Rights said...

1. No. A UK passport is fine, but of course, you'll need a work permit.

2. No. Just apply to be called to the bar when you get to Trinidad.

Anonymous said...

Hi how long does it take to finish law school

Trinbago Rights said...

T&T & UK - LLB is 3 years then...
T&T - Hugh Wooding for 2 years OR
UK - LPC for 1 year

USA - Bachelor's degree is 4 years then the JD is 3 years.

Anonymous said...

HI I am currently doing my llb through the University of London but I am struggling to chose to be a family lawyer of company lawyer. Which you think maybe more interesting and I can make a good salary??

Trinbago Rights said...

Corporate.

Anonymous said...

Can you tell me which institution is better for a person to do their llb either through UWI or UK. I am hearing all sorts of feedback where UWI don't recognize London llb so I am wondering if UWI is better or they both rank at the same level. Thanks

Trinbago Rights said...

Is this a serious question? You're wondering if a UK LLB is equivalent to a UWI LLB?

Listen, when it comes to law, there is no country superior to the UK. People who attend UWI teach themselves. Anand Ramlogan is a product of UWI who graduated on top of his class... look how dumb he is.

Of course UWI accepts UK LLBs; what do you think K.Beckles and all those other schools give you?

Anonymous said...

Lol thanks for the info. I asked because persons who did theirLLB @UWI seem to think that there is better than the UK and that's why UWI graduate are automatically accepted in hughwooding & graduates from the UK have to write an entrance exam so I was confuse thanks again.

Trinbago Rights said...

UWI automatically accepts their students into Hugh Wooding to encourage enrollment, no other reason.

That person is clearly delusional and is exactly why I discourage everyone from attending UWI.

Mellissa Lezama said...

I am currently studying the LPC at a London-based University and am exploring my options in order to qualify as a solicitor. I saw on your site that persons who've attained the LPC can qualify in Trinbago after working under a lawyer (10 yrs exp) for 6 months. Is this still relevant and applicable?

Trinbago Rights said...

Yes!

Anonymous said...

Hi can you please tell me what good institution in the US I could finish my LLB from the University of London and probably do my LLM.I may get through with my green card before I finish the LLB so I want to be prepared thanks.

Trinbago Rights said...

US universities do not offer the LL.B.

Anonymous said...

I am 15 yrs old and i want to pursue a career in corporate and business law. I am currently doing these subjects : Principle of Accounts,Math,English and English Lit, Science,History and Geography.
Are these good?
Any suggestions?

Anonymous said...

Do you if to do history (CAPE) to become a lawyer??

jeremy ramsingh said...

What are the best subjects and qualifications to become a business and corporate lawyer
Any advice?

Trinbago Rights said...

Law is not interdisciplinary, so anything you do besides law will not provide much assistant with law school.


However, law requires extreme amounts of reading and writing, so doing English A & B will prepare you somewhat for that.

Trinbago Rights said...

No.

Trinbago Rights said...

Just specialise by doing a masters in Corporate law. Before that, nothing is going to really help.

Anonymous said...

Hey I would just like to know if being fluent in french and spanish would be an asset if i were to become a corporate lawyer. Thanks (:

Trinbago Rights said...

I'm jealous!

Fluency in any language besides English would make you HIGHLY desirable.

I have already imagined you working as a legal adviser of a multinational corporation. Your salary will be out of this world.

Best of luck to you!

Anonymous said...

What is the average salary of a lawyer in T&T?

Trinbago Rights said...

There's no average salary, it depends on how hard you work, how good you become and how your market yourself.

Anonymous said...

Hi I am currently doing my Associate Degree in Paralegal Studies at UWI and I have been searching for employment in this field, but most of the legal jobs available are asking for 2 and 3 years experience or an LLB. Are there any internship programmes in Trinidad and Tobago?

Anonymous said...

If I do my LLB from the UK can I be employed in the USA or do I need to do a US course to be employed?

Trinbago Rights said...

An LLB doesn't make you a Lawyer, so you won't get a job doing anything with just that.

Also, the legal systems are very different, so entry to do the bar there is very tedious.

Trinbago Rights said...

You'll have to contact the individual law firms to get that info.

Anonymous said...

I saw your profile and I wanted to ask how you did the transition from Law to HRM? I find that to be interesting because I am interested in both but someone told me that I"ll have to choose because law and HR don't go together. can you advise me? Thanks.

Trinbago Rights said...

Did a business degree, liked HR, which has a lot of employment law issues, so I moved to law and they both work in tandem.

Anonymous said...

oh interesting well I currently have and economics degree(A waste) lol now doing my LLB and I currently work in an industrial relations environment which is the employment law side but how do I transition to HR so I can do both? Do I need to do my masters in HR to get a better understanding? What can you advice I do? thanks.

Anonymous said...

what are the requirements to study law?how many subjects must you have?if any at all.....

Trinbago Rights said...

You have to contact the university you intend on attending to enquire about for their respective entry requirements.

Trinbago Rights said...

A Masters would help, but practical experience would be best.

Christine said...

Hi

I have completed the GDL and LPC in the UK. I was told I need to do two years at a law school to practice law in Trinidad. On the other hand I was told I can just do 6 months practice with a lawyer and then be called to the bar. I have not completed a training contract in the UK.

Can you advise which is correct.

Many thanks

Trinbago Rights said...

6 months.
http://www.hwls.edu.tt/entry-transitional

Anonymous said...

For the people who did the LPC in the UK can share where and average costs please.

Great job sharing your knowledge Legal Rights. Its like you have to beg these school for simple information. Thanks.

Trinbago Rights said...

When I signed up in 2010, it was £9500

Oneka Campbell said...

I have a JD from a College of Law in Florida. What is the best route to practice in Trinidad. I am a citizen of Trinidad and Tobago. Do I have to take Florida's Bar exam and then seek to convert? How does it work?

Anonymous said...

I'm 30 years old and thinking about becoming a lawyer. I already hold a bsc in econ but from an american university and thinking of going to Beckles law school for an llb.

What is the possibility of doing both the llb and lec in under 4 years? I say this as I work in magistrate's court as a research and statistics clerk. I heard the lec takes 18 months? I can't seem to find out an exact period of time.

Thanks in advance for your help

Trinbago Rights said...

Mate, don't do a full LLB, since you already have a degree. I did my degree in the US, then I went to the UK and did the GDL/CPE, which is 1 year. Don't waste 3 years of your life at this age.

If you take the route you're contemplating, you won't be qualified until 35... if you go to the UK, you'll be practicing in 2 years.

Trinbago Rights said...

Ranked according to shortest route to practice.

1. Qualify in Florida, then do the 6-month LEC at Hugh Wooding

2. Go to UK and do the GDL/CPE and then the LPC

3. Return to Trinidad and do the LLB and then LEC

Anonymous said...

Hey after you get your LEC...what is the next step?.. do i have to train with a firm before getting called to the bar and how long does it take to get called to the bar in Trinidad?...

Anonymous said...

Does completing the 6 month transitional course qualify you to be admitted as a lawyer in Antigua and Barbuda?

Anonymous said...

does completing the 6 month course qualify you to be admitted Antigua and Barbuda

Anonymous said...

Hello, I have completed the GDL and LPC and was looking into qualifying in Trinidad as I am a national. The law association website does not explain whether GDL is deemed to be a qualifying law degree for the purposes of qualifying if I was to do the 6 months attachment. Also can the attachment be done in the legal department of a public body or must it be with a private chambers? Thanks.

Anonymous said...

Hey what is the basic salary of a lawyer directly out of Hugh Wooden ?

Trinbago Rights said...

Seeing that you can't spell the name of the school properly, and that you did not take enough time to read the above comments, you might struggle in the field, mate.

Anonymous said...

I am currently a law student reading for my LLB at UWI Mona and I have been contemplating going to America or the UK to obtain my LEC for a different experience. Just wanted to gauge which route you think is the most sensible. Should I just go back home to Trinidad and attend Hugh Wooding when I'm done or take a more exciting journey in a different country?

Trinbago Rights said...

I studied exclusively away and I am not a fan on UWI Trinidad, so that's a prelude to my answer...

In the UK, you do the 1-year LPC, which is shorter and you have more options upon qualification. With the LPC, you can practice throughout the Caribbean, UK, and easy transition to Canada.

In the US, you'll have to do the 3-year JD and then sit the bar for that specific state, which means you can only practice in that state.

Anonymous said...

what grades do i need at cape to study law at UWI

Trinbago Rights said...

Fortunately, I did not study at UWI, so you'll have to contact them.

Anonymous said...

Hi is it possible to study law in the U.S and practice in the Caribbean? If it is how would one do so ?

Trinbago Rights said...

It's possible, but very hard. Remember, the legal systems are very different to each other. However, to practice in the Caribbean, you'd need to do the 6-month LEC in Jamaica, the Bahamas or T&T.

Anonymous said...

I am 37 years old and I would like to become a lawyer is that a good idea

Trinbago Rights said...

Not sure what you mean by "is that a good idea?". If that's what YOU want to do, go for it!

Anonymous said...

I will like to become an Attorney at-Law ever since I was a child but the problem is that 11 yrs ago I was convicted of a crime and now I still want to pursue Law , but what bothers me the most is that supposed I go through with the whole process and at the end of it the Bar association turns me down then what should I do , she I change my career path or just proceed with my future plans

Trinbago Rights said...

You have to contact the Law Association.

Anonymous said...

i am a secondary student and i want to pursue law what are the subjects mainly needed

Trinbago Rights said...

It doesn't matter what you study. In order to study law, you need to love reading and writing. Subjects are irrelevant.

Anonymous said...

Hey, i'm a form 5 student and I would like to know when I finish cxc, I can go straight to UWI and pursue my degree for 3 years and then take a 2 year course at COSTAAT or Hugh Wooding Law School? Yes or no? correct me if i'm wrong. I would like to be a family lawyer though. :)

Trinbago Rights said...

I have never attended UWI, but I believe they require A levels.

COSTAATT has a paralegal course, so that's the wrong path for qualifying as a Lawyer.

I believe you may be able to get into one of the private law schools like K. Beckles.

DO NOT WASTE TIME DOING A LEVELS!!!!

Anonymous said...

Is it better to do an LPC or LEC and why. If I decide the LPC route do I have to do any transitional programmes when I come back to Trinidad. Thank you

Trinbago Rights said...

My biased answer is that any legal studies in England will always be superior to T&T.

You'll have to do the 6-month attachment.

Anonymous said...

what are the qualifications for becoming a lawyer of criminal justice?

Trinbago Rights said...

Do you mean a criminal lawyer? The same thing applies above.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for the information. I'm a Court Transcriptionist about to pursue LLB, thanks for the information

Anonymous said...

A levels are a waste of time for real

Trinbago Rights said...

Good luck...

Anonymous said...

Im a student of lower 6 and intend to study law after upper 6
In your opinion which would be the better school between UWI and K. Beckles?

Joe Marlon said...

i would like to know if the L.P.C and the post graduate diploma in legal practice has the same in content. Is the later recognized in Trinidad.

Trinbago Rights said...

The CPE/GDL is what students with a non-law Bachelor's degree have to do before being allowed to do the LPC (equivalent to LEC).

I did the CPE/GDL at the University of Hertfordshire and it is an intense LLB, where you learn all the core subjects with a couple electives in a short space of time. We had all-day classes everyday for two terms, if I remember correctly.

Trinbago Rights said...

I did the same thing... yes it is recognized. You could've just called, mate.

Anonymous said...

how to further education in law after finishing secondary level education?

Anonymous said...

Is the LLB the only route to becoming a lawyer in the Caribbean? I asked because in the UK there is the Graduate Diploma in Law for those who hold non-law related degrees. Would I be able to attend a law school in the Caribbean with the Graduate Diploma in Law?

Trinbago Rights said...

Yes, the GDL/CPE is recognized.

Anonymous said...

Iam currently doing my degree at the UWI, im pursuing a BSc in Agricultural science and environmental and natural resource management. I am intrested in law. Where can I go to study environmental law in trinidad. Also can you give me a list of the laws other than criminal law? Thank you!

Trinbago Rights said...

https://www.scribd.com/doc/196734452/Faculty-of-Law-2012-2013-Complete-Copy

Anonymous said...

hi i'm doing a bsc biology after which I wish to do the GDL. I like medical law. What's the status of medical law in T&T? Thank you.

Anonymous said...

Hi good day, how do I get a work at the industrial court trinidad and Tobago?

Anonymous said...

Hi good day, I would liketo know if environmental law is something 'big' in trinidad

Trinbago Rights said...

Don't you think they are the ones you should be contacting?

Anonymous said...

Is there a limit to the time period one spends to attain an LLB and does it affect ability to enter the LEC? What is a Qualifying Law Degree in the eyes of Hugh Wooding in Trinidad and Tobago?

Trinbago Rights said...

Yes, the institution will tell you how long you have to complete it, If you don't complete it, you usually have to start over.

QLDs are LL.Bs and PgDLs/CPEs

Anonymous said...

Trinbago Rights, ive stumbled upon this blog and I must say, job well done-I am impressed and applaud what you are doing here. I have a few questions of my own seeing that I am doing the UoL LLB Intl Programme, my only option at this point is part time ( i already have an undergrad and graduate degree)-so this route works for me. I share your same sentiments with UWI, i got accepted to do law years ago at UWI and changed my mind the last minute in favour of the US. My clarification needed is-are u saying that after the UoL LLB or GDL, u simply do the LPC, then TT 6 month conversion, then call to the TT bar, or other? Also, u said BPTC was a waste of time,why? and whats the difference between the LPC and BPTC-im in the middle of research myself here, but id love to hear your take, or anything that would advance me meanwhile..thanks man

Trinbago Rights said...

LPC is one year - BPTC is 2 (with pupillage)

In the UK, the LPC qualifies you as a Solicitor - BPTC qualifies you as a Barrister

The main difference between the two is "rights of audience".

In T&T, we don't distinguish between the two, so if you intend on returning to T&T, why do a 2 year course that has no benefit?

Anonymous said...

I have completed the LLB and LPC in the UK but I haven't completed a training contract. I would like to qualify in all the Caribbean territories, not only Trinidad, so I would like to apply for the 6 months programme at Hugh Wooding/Norman Manley.
I noticed that the application form is asking for a certificate of admission and certificate of good standing, which is given to qualified Solicitors. Were persons accepted to the 6 months programme with the LLB and LPC only? Was it difficult to be accepted to the programme without these certificates?

Trinbago Rights said...

The 6-month programme is really designed for those who have just the LLB and LPC... simple process. Just send in your application.

Anonymous said...

I am currently doing my LLB in Trinidad and planning to my LEC in UK. However, i wish to complete my masters while in England. Is that possible or do is it required to do the training program in Trinidad before doing your masters.

Thank you in advance :)

Trinbago Rights said...

The L.E.C. is indigenous to the Caribbean. You can do the L.P.C. and then do a Masters before returning to Trinbago.

Anonymous said...

Excellent blog, I certainly benefited and applaud the overall effort and goodwill.

I'm 29 and hold advanced degrees, but considering the 1 year distance learning GDL from BPP Law School in the UK. BPP seems to be the only school to offer this "accelerated" format fully online. Furthermore they guarantee admission to their LPC program upon completion, which is also offered online.

Two questions:

1. What was your 1 year GDL course load like, ideally in terms of hours per day/ week of actual reading/ preparation. I work full-time, though have more than average flexibility and am willing to put in the work... just want to be realistic about the commitment.

2. I saw that you did your GDL at Uni of Hertfordshire, but where did you do your LPC and what was your experience like?

Thanks in advance and good luck with your Phd.

Trinbago Rights said...

1. If my memory serves me correctly, it was 8-5 Tuesday and Thursday. 4 classes each term. Doing a course at the location is nothing compared to on-line... more discipline and dedication is required.

2. Started LPC at London Met, then College of Law, before opting to do the J.D. in California instead.

Anonymous said...

Very interesting.

Did you eventually do the 6 month transition course in Trinidad? If so, how did this serve/ hinder you, to have the combo of GDL J.D?

The J.D. initially seemed especially long, but if is essentially entitles you to do one of the US Bar qualifications right away, then in reality one can argue it could be considered equivalent to the time required to do both GDL and LPC i.e. 2-3 years (e.g. Northwestern has a top-rated 2 year J.D.). Comments?

For clarity, my interests are at the intersection of business and law. While doing the GDL LPC is a fairly quick route, an accelerated 2 year J.D. or even 3 year J.D./ MBA (either in addition to or instead of a GDL), especially at a top US school, could pique my interest if key elements are comparable, and of course costs work out.

Footnote: Although I have been advised otherwise, on numerous occasions, I personally see long-term value in becoming fully qualified in at least one key market (ideally Trinidad but not necessarily limited to this), despite heavy business ambitions.

Just looking to you for general comments and healthy discussion based on your experience, even if to poke holes.

Trinbago Rights said...

I have intentions of moving back to the US at some point, hence the J.D. It is much longer and it's equivalent to the G.D.L. & L.P.C. together.

Anonymous said...

If an individual already has a BSc and a Masters, neither in law, is the GDL and LPC the required route to take as well?
Thanks for your response.

Trinbago Rights said...

Yes

Anonymous said...

I have read almost all these comments after I just stumbled upon this page while doing research.But still need clarification on one thing.

I plan to do the BPTC in Uk because I am doing my Bachelor in International Law in Europe currently and would like to stay here (hopefully)for a couple years. However, going back to Trinidad may be an option after a couple years. Question: If I have been called to the bar in UK and a qualified barrister, what would be the step to practicing law in T&T?

Would I still have to go to Hugh Wooding for the conversion course? Or is it that as a qualified lawyer, I can skip that step?.
Thank you for this information

Trinbago Rights said...

Everyone has to do the 6-month placement.

Anonymous said...

Congratulations on your exponential success thus far and thank you very much for your deep insight on this topic of law. I am an a level student on my last year. I am opting to go to UWI to do the LLB only because of financial restrains. However i want to become an excellent lawyer, while also studying biology and sociology. Should my journey be: 

A) go to UWI get my LLB, then go to UK and get my LPC, then masters, then study biology n sociology

B) go to UWI do a double major in biology and sociology, then go to UK and get my GDL then my LPC then come back to trini
C)) any other options u have?

Trinbago Rights said...

Option B.

Anonymous said...

May i ask why u chose that route in particular?

Anonymous said...

Wow!!!!... this is not for you to post, but rather for you to just read. Thank you thank you soooĆ²o much. . I have 1 month to make up my mind as to what im goin to study n in what order...i literally searched on google "being a lawyer in trinidad" and stumbled upon your website..i became addicted to the discussions and i read each n everyone. Thank you so much. Not only do i leave with knowledge about my career path but i leave filled with knowledge from areas i only subconsciously thought about. You are the type of person we need in our schools to guide our career path in law in terms of the routes to take. I had no idea of the journey before reading your comments based on questions people posted..I am the person who messaged yesterday concerning law..biology and sociology... at first i thought that i wouldnt have gotten a reply..but i caught myself continually checking the website waiting for this "ghost of a person"... wen i saw that u replied..i was truly shocked... n it was only some hrs after i believe..wow... thank you.n may God continue to bless your soul..hopefully one day our paths will cross Jamille.... *Ayanna*

Trinbago Rights said...

It's the most sensible.

A - could take you approximately 7/8 years to accomplish

B - could take 4/5 years and I have always believed that Attorneys should study more than law... the GDL is all you need, not a 3 year useless LLB.

C - B would've been my advice anyway

Anonymous said...

Understood :) thank you

Elle J said...

HI, I've read most of the comments and your feedback has been very informative and you seem approachable. I am over 35 and have been teaching Science for more than 12 years. I have my first degree from UWI but did my Master's in Holland and other short courses in the UK - all related to Science or Education. So I would like to know a. what could be the shortest route possible for me to take to obtaining and practicing law in Trinidad. I have an interest in Environmental or Copyright Law ( pertaining to Entertainment industry) and b. what legal studies schools in Trinidad would you recommend for pursuing such studies.
Thanks much

Trinbago Rights said...

Actually, mate, if you ask me, the best option for law in the Caribbean is UWI - Cavehill is #1, but St. Augustine isn't too shabby either. The quality of the University of London distance learning programmes in T&T is extremely poor and exorbitantly expensive. Some of the lecturers themselves studied via distance learning (self-teaching/learning) or attended UWI (Caribbean law). Neither of these people are qualified enough (in my mind) to teach a British course because as I'm sure you're aware, the UK system is way more advanced and the laws aren't as antiquated. The programmes encourage a dilution of the quality of the legal profession and I am totally against them. No other respectable profession has a distance learning programme... why should law?

Nonetheless, I've heard of a Graduate route LLB entry at one the distance-learning institutions, but I'm not sure if it's actually offered. The only school that will get my suggestion is K. Beckles in POS, but according to many past students, Mr. Beckles himself is the only good lecturer... and apparently, he only teaches one course called Jurisprudence.

If you can afford it, I will always suggest going to England and doing the GDL (1 year) followed by the LPC (1 year), then return home and do your 6-month placement and get called.

Anonymous said...

Hello, I would like to know if I am on the right path. I am 18 years and very interested in studying law. Studying outside of Trinidad is not an option therefore I would like your advice on what I should do and where I should go.
I do not have CAPE, however, I was told that I can do my diploma in law.
This is my idea, please tell me if I am going about this the right way.
Study diploma in law at CLS (1year), then pursue my LLB at ILAS (2 years), followed by LEC at Hugh Wooding (2 years)
This would take me 5 years minimum, which I am quite ok with.
Is there any other route I can take, minimum years of studying yet it would be beneficial??
I am interested in specializing in contact and real estate law, which I was told takes approx 6 months each after completing the LEC and writing the bar exam etc.
Please assist me.
Thank you

Trinbago Rights said...

You've got it spot-on, mate.

Anonymous said...

Im currently pursuing my second year in a level and im caught in confusion as to whether i should attain my llb at UWI or the University of London through cls. The thing is i want to migrate to Canada in future but im aware that the American law is most different from British and Caribbean law and i would have to write the same American bar exams to work in Canada whether the llb i from uwi or london. I would like to know whether it makes sense to spend so much for the uk llb or do the llb at uwi considering i will migrate to Canada, would it make much of a difference as to which institution i attend ? Your advice would be most appreciated thank you

Trinbago Rights said...

#1 - UWI's degree is better than that watered down crap from the UoL.

#2 - If you attend a foreign law school and wish to become a Canadian lawyer, your education must be approved by the National Committee on Accreditation (NCA). You must submit your qualifications and experience in law to the NCA. The NCA will then determine what, if any, further coursework you must complete at an approved Canadian law school prior to licensure as a lawyer in your province. You may also be asked to complete examinations in order to qualify for licensure. If you qualify, you will be issued a Certificate of Qualification, which you may use to seek entry to your province’s law society (each province is different).

Anonymous said...

I have applied for the 6 month transition programme at HWLS and I am waiting to hear whether my application is successful. I live in London, have a law degree and did the BVC (BPTC) A few questions for you:
A) other than the application requirements posted on the HWLS website do they use any other criteria to determine whether you are accepted on the programme
B) did you or others you know undertake the 6 month programme at HWLS and if so what was the experience like.
C) what would be your top 3 tips for someone like myself undertaking this programme.


kayashta dass said...

Greetings,

I apologise in advance for making you repeat yourself but i just needed clarification for my specific case after reading through all the comments and responses. What are the steps/ best options after graduating with a LLB from QMUL (Queen Mary University of London as i start law from September). If i get my BVC or LPC in England, what are further steps needed to be able to practice in TT ( i have to fulfill obligatory service therefore i need to be able to practice in TT). Do i need to train for a year in England/training contract (law firms are saturated and less are financing the LPC as there are more applicants than places available) and then do 6 months in TT? I just need a list of clear steps after graduating with my LLb from QMUL.
Thank you.
GD

Trinbago Rights said...

Law is a lot of reading and comprehension. Being a law student and asking me this question again makes me wonder...

Joshua Phillip said...

Hi, I am doing my A'levels in humanities and wanted to study law in Canada. Would i be able to become an attorney in Trinidad if i study in canada?

Trinbago Rights said...

The procedure should be the same coming from a Commonwealth country.

Anonymous said...

Hey there, so, I'm about to enter l6 in Trinidad but I need some advice. How do I go about the entire procedure of obtaining my law degree? Some people have told that one would have to complete 1yr at UWI St. Augustine and then 2yrs at Cavehill after that what's the procedure? Or can you give me an alternative route?

Trinbago Rights said...

You can now do all 3 at St. Augustine.

Anonymous said...

Apparently, Hugh Wooding does not accept a LLB and LPC only for the 6 months transitional programme, you need to complete a training contract also.

Trinbago Rights said...

That is untrue, unless that policy was changed within the last few months. I will confirm with HW tomorrow.

Anonymous said...

Hi, I stumbled on this forum and found it extremely informative. Thank you. My case is as follows- I completed CIM- Chartered Institute of Marketing also completed MBA with Heriot Watt; and now I would like explore becoming a lawyer. Based on info in this forum I will further research GDL/CPE and LPC.
But realistically what do you think are my options?

Trinbago Rights said...

That is your best option.

Anonymous said...

hi good-day, i am pursuing my study in GDL Law. i would like to know if the GDL law is accepted in Trinidad and Tobago or am i wasting time with this.

Trinbago Rights said...

I have answered this question before. As a matter of fact, the GDL has been mentioned 23 times above.

Reading is important for law students.

I did the GDL.

Giselle Ramdial said...

Hi, I'm currently finishing my last year of cape and I've been thinking about becoming a lawyer, but I don't know what type of lawyer as yet!
Do you have any clue of which lawyer earns more income in Trinidad!?

Anonymous said...

i completed an LLB with the University of South Africa and currently studying for my LLM family Law with the same varsity,What woulf be required of me to practice in the caribean

Trinbago Rights said...

I am not sure. You should call Hugh Wooding to find out. Hopefully you find someone competent to assist over the phone, as that's usually not the case.

Trinbago Rights said...

If money is the predominant motivation for your interest in the legal profession, please stay out. There are enough rapacious lawyers in T&T who need to be disbarred from practice.

Yes, money is important, but many of us do this mainly because we love it and because rights is our main focus, which is what the legal profession is grounded upon historically.

Another reason why the distance leanring LLB's are a bad thing for this country. Too many lawyers... too many crooks.

Giselle Ramdial said...

Is not like I'll be greedy for money, or demand more than what I deserve.
I mean I'll love to help people out and stand up for them and earn a good enough salary as well.
OK let me put it this way is there a demand for lawyers in t&t? And what type?

Trinbago Rights said...

The legal profession is saturated, so there's no demand per se, but the numbers increase every year.

Make a name for yourself and you'll make what you should be making. I don't practice, so carved out my own niche in employment and labour (industrial relations), but that's because I have a passion for the area. Other Lawyers have a passion for different areas, and a friend of mine has a Masters degree in family law. So it's up to you to decide what direction you want to go.

The main areas of practice are family and land. Less than 10% of lawyers do criminal.

Anonymous said...

I would like to know what is the qualifications for a lawyer in the Magistrate court?? Just magistrate. In Trinidad and Tobago

Trinbago Rights said...

Once qualified, a Lawyer has "right of audience" at all courts.

Anonymous said...

What subjects u need to become a lawyer.... eg math English? What subjects?

Trinbago Rights said...

Passion and integrity. Nothing else matters.

Anonymous said...

I am 21 years old and I finished school at G.C.E level about five years ago I currently work at a local bank and I want to pursue a career as an Attorney.Can you advise me?

Anonymous said...

I hope to take the following route to qualify-UK GDL then LPC then return to Trini for 6mth training with an attorney then get called to bar. Called HWLS- they said the option after the LPC is 2 year programme not the transitional 6mths. I followed up with an email for further clarification and await a response. Do you have any suggestions here as I am baffled at their response? I have just been accepted to do GDL in UK.

Trinbago Rights said...

You spoke to the wrong person at HWLS. What you said is correct.

Anonymous said...

Well HWLS never responded but I got confirmation from the Law Association quite promptly.

Anonymous said...

Hi, I am a British citizen and have completed my LLB and LPC in England and i am currently working in a firm in England but awaiting to commence my training contract. I am considering moving to Trinidad for family reasons, what is the route for me to carry on my legal career in Trinidad?

Trinbago Rights said...

Already answered numerous times above.

Nadz said...

I want to know if it is legal for a university to allow you to graduate and three months after the graduation right before they release your certificate they told you that you are lacking there credits and they would be with holding your degree if not completed?

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