Sunday, 29 May 2011

Trinidad and Tobago Firearm Law

Q: Why do criminals arrested for the possession of illegal firearms and ammunition always end up back on the streets?




A: I really cannot answer this question, but I will state the law as it relates to this.

In Trinidad and Tobago, we are more vulnerable than other Caribbean countries to the trading of drugs and guns because of our proximity to South America. In light of this, it would be common sense for our laws to reflect punishment severe enough to deter criminals, but while the laws are there, the enforcement isn't. And when our own Police Officers are corrupt, there won't be much progress.

The first Firearms Act was introduced in 1970, but has had numerous amendments since then, with the latest amendment being assented on February 8, 2011.

According to Section 6(1) of the Firearms Act (as amended), in order to be in possession of a firearm, a person must hold a Firearm User's License, unless acting in the capacity of exceptions under 6(2) and 7(1), which includes, Police Officers, etc.

6(3)(a)(i) has been amended to state that the summary conviction for contravention of 6(1) will result in a TT$15,000 fine and 8 years imprisonment, which should be increased to 15 years upon indictment. Also see Section 6(4).

Then there is the issue of bail under the Bail Act (as amended). In this Act, crimes are separated into categories according to severity of the offence; Part I and Part II of the First Schedule. Part I offences are non-bailable, while Part II offences (which includes the offence of possession of firearms and ammunition) are bailable only for the first 3 offences within the last 15 years, according to Section 5(2).


That's the law, so why isn't it being upheld and enforced?

16 comments:

  1. why is it all most impossible ,for the advrage citizen to be issued a firearm permit ? And it is so readly available for upper class .Is it a violation of my rights under the equal rights act ?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's impossible because you probably have no real justification for it. This isn't America, sorry.

      There is no "Equal Rights Act" in Trinidad and Tobago.

      Delete
  2. Tell the Equal Rights Commission that.

    ReplyDelete
  3. But the real reasons upper -class citizens have access to licensed Firearms is simply money. One other main reason is that people in power are still suffering from the Colonial Syndrome. They are automatically drawn to care for the masters. Modern day Masters are the elite to the under-class. Weak pitiful people.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Let's say I'm a director of a company and I currently have a firearms licence but I'm planning to leave the company. Can I transfer my licence to another director?

    ReplyDelete
  5. hi :), how can I import an Air rifle legally? What is the procedure?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Get an import license, or find someone like myself who already has one.

      Delete
    2. Hello if I have a firearm permit and wanted to buy a illegal gun ,what do I have to do n do I have to Register it with the police ????

      Delete
  6. You can \get charged for possession of an illegal firearm. You must be in possession of an F.U.L. - Firearm Users License before you are allowed to own a gun.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I gave a registered 9mm in the US. I'm moving to TT, what do I need to do to legally bring my gun there?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You must get a Firearm User's License first... visit Police Headquarters.

      Delete
  8. LAWS OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO L.R.O. 3/1971. Citation. Interpretation. Air weapons. SUBSIDIARY LEGISLATION FIREARMS (AIR WEAPONS) ORDER made under section 2 1. This Order may be cited as the Firearms (Air Weapons) Order. 2. In this Order “air weapon” means an air rifle, air gun or air pistol. 3. For the purposes of the definition of “firearm” occurring in section 2 of the Firearms Act, it is hereby declared that a firearm does not include air weapons of or below .177 calibre, unless the barrel thereof is rifled.
    The above quote from the Firearms (Air Weapons) order, states that an air rifle that is .177 and smooth bore is not a firearm. Therefore, why do one have to get a firearm dealer\\\'s licence to import air rifle for resale? Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. AHHHHHH.. it's the SAME question I have been asking for years. The answer is called "do what we want" because no one says anything.

      Delete
    2. Now that I raise the subject, what can be done to correct this anomaly? Could this be addressed by the courts so that one can apply to the Ministry of Trade to obtain a licence to import Air Rifles? I remember years ago, you could have bought a pellet gun from the village shop.

      Delete
    3. All it takes is one person to challenge the law. Just like the unconstitutionality of wrecking...

      Delete

“Knowledge, like air, is vital to life. Like air, no one should be denied it."